The Dog in the Yearbook

This month’s co-hosts for WATWB are Emerald Barnes, Eric Lahti, Inderpreet Uppal,  Lynn Hallbrooks,  Peter Nena, Roshan Radhakrishnan. Please visit their sites too. For this month’s We Are the World Blogfest, consider how much help our service dog companions offer to those of us who need them. Everyone’s familiar with drug and bomb sniffing dogs. But service dogs […]

Tears and Laughter in the Desert

For this month’s We are the World Blogfest, we offer a mention of an interesting article from Desert Exposure. [You’ll need to zoom in to read the article or download the entire issue and read it as a PDF.] The monthly paper is an eclectic mix of event listings, features on local culture, restaurant reviews, spiritual/metaphysical […]

Earth Day

This isn’t my usual WIP today. It’s part recollection and part a paean to our planet. We live here, we need to protect it to protect ourselves. The first Earth Day came during the first quarter of the first year of college for me. Yes, a long time ago–I’m that old. Perhaps the ecology movement that started […]

In Case You Missed Them

For those of you new to the site, you might not have seen these from the fall of 2014. Since they’re both short, I’ll include two little self-reflective gems. They’re slightly revised–for the better I believe. Where to Find Sorts When You Are Out of Them from October 1, 2014 We are all mad here, said […]

The Third Age–What You Can Learn from Fortune Cookies

Fortune cookies occasionally offer genuine wisdom. So it was one night in 2016, eating at the one remaining Chinese restaurant in our small town. The one I got said this: “It’s not the years in your life but the life in your years that count.” That seems true enough. In the Third Age, as some […]

Winter’s Grip Comes Early to Much of America

Been there, done that. A phrase perhaps out of favor by now, through overuse. Still, it applies. Growing up there and spending many years off and on, Minneapolis is feeling an early cold snap right now. One January, some decades ago, the average temperature for the month was well below zero. But here’s a fond […]

Shakespeare’s Sleep–Elusive for Some

He died at 52–probably a long life in the 16th century. Still, I must suppose that had Shakespeare lived another 15 years he might have worded these lines from Hamlet a little differently, To sleep, perchance to dream. Seriously, for most guys over 60 or certainly 65, it’s more like, To sleep, perchance to pee. More […]

Kafka on the Shore

I’ve never read any of Murakami’s work–which this short piece will demonstrate. It comes just from the title, an excerpt from which was a writing prompt. I am breaking my rule, just a bit, throwing in a little politics here. I hope you won’t mind too much. It is still a fictional fancy. We’ve never […]

The Vagaries of Family History and Genealogical Records

No fiction today (so far as I know). That will return next week. Oddly enough, this narrative does come from a writing prompt at this week’s Gila Writers Group. I began genealogical research the year I retired. That fall I traveled to Minnesota to see where some of my relatives lived, not being content with […]

Cultural Artifacts from 80s Japan

Back in the 1980s I made three trips to Japan on religious pilgrimages. Volunteer drivers ferried the visitors from central collection points to the homes of local members. On one of those trips, most likely an early one, the driver ushered us into a Toyota Crown Saloon, a model sold only in Japan and select […]